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Historic Homesteads

Page history last edited by PBworks 13 years, 8 months ago

 Homestead at Lynn

 

The Orchard House

 

John Wing's Sautucket Home

 

Daniel Wing's Homestead

 

The "Fort House"

 

John Wing of Rochester

 

Daniel Jr Homestead

 

Bachelor Wing of Drinkwater

 

Jashub Wing Homestead

 

"Natty" Wing Homestead

 

John Wing of Scorton Neck

 

Edward Wing Homestead

 

Foster-Wing Homestead

 

Ricketson Homestead

 

Matthew Wing Homestead

 

SEE MAP

Homestead in Saugus (Lynn)

    The homestead is described as “two acres, more or less, the house now standeth upon adjoining upon the town common on the East, and West upon the lands of Richard Rooten, South upon the Sea, and North upon the lands of Francis Ingalls.” (Tilton, of Lynn and Ipswich, Davis III:445)

     It appears that this property was near, if not adjacent to, the church Rev. Stephen Bachiler established at Saugus (now Lynn). It is likely Rev. Bachiler was granted this property for both the church and his residence by the local authorities, and when he removed from Saugus, he left the property to his daughter and her family. (See Owl SEP 1931, p. 2917 for a short description of the first church building in Saugus/Lynn)

 

 

Stephen Bachiler 1632-c1634

John Wing c1634 – 1637

At Book 2, page 20, in the record of Essex County deeds, there is a deed from Daniel King of Lynn, gent., of five acres of upland, ‘being a neck of land given to John Winge, abutting easterly upon the highway, that runneth across the brooke, which runneth out of the marsh * * which lyeth northwest from the dwelling house of Henry Collem, etc., given Sept. 1, 1654. (Owl MAR 1907, p. 595)

 

William Tilton 1637 –

On March 8, 1653/4, Roger and Susanna Shaw sold to Thomas Chadwell, Richard Rooten and John Hude the Lynn house and land “lately in the occupation of the lately deceased Wiliam Tilton and his by reason of purchase from John Wing, and by him left to Susanna, his wife, as sole executrix, and now in the hands of Roger Shaw aforesaid by way of contraction and marriage of the said executrix.” The homestead is described as “two acres, more or less, the house now standeth upon adjoining upon the town common on the East, and West upon the lands of Richard Rooten, South upon the Sea, and North upon the lands of Francis Ingalls.” There were also included three acres at Sagamore hill, four acres of salt marsh on the Saugus river and twelve acres of planting-ground.* [* Essex Deeds, 6:   ]  The inventory of William Tilton, taken 16 APR 1653 appraised his house and land as £30 [from The Probate Records of Essex County, I:155] (Tilton, of Lynn and Ipswich, Davis III:445)

 

 

 

First Church of Lynn corner of South Common and Vine Streets

    The claim has formerly been made that this is the oldest church in America that has changed neither its location nor its faith. (Address of Rev. George W. Owen, A.M. at the 275th Anniversary of the church; in Celebration of the 275th anniversary of the First Church of Christ… Lynn, MA; Press of T.P. Nichols & Sons, 1907, 1690 pgs., p. 31)

    There is no authentic picture of the first meeting house which was east of Shepard Street at the rear of 244 Summer Street. Lewis states that it was moved to the Common and formed a portion of the second church. Moulton claims that it was moved and formed a portion of the Alley house on Harbor Street, which was torn down in 1896. (ibid., p. 74a)

    The first meeting house was a small plain building, without bell or cupola, and stood on the eastern side of Shepard street. It was placed in a small hollow, that it might be the better sheltered from the winds, and was approached by descending several steps. (Lewis, History of Lynn, 1829, p. 41)

    It appears that, much like in Boston, the land mass of Lynn, Mass. has been expanded. John Wing’s property in Lynn was described as two acres more or less, bounded by both the Town common and the sea. Today the Town common is approximately ½ mile from the coast. In addition, it is likely the Town common has shrunk from its original size.

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